Dani Rodrik

autor

Globalization Paradox


In this eloquent challenge to the reigning wisdom on globalization, Dani Rodrik reminds us of the importance of the nation-state, arguing forcefully that when the social arrangements of democracies inevitably clash with the international demands of globalization, national priorities should take precedence. Combining history with insight, humor with good-natured critique, Rodrik s case for a customizable globalization supported by a light frame of international rules shows the way to a balanced prosperity as we confront today s global challenges in trade, finance, and labor markets.
Vypredané
17,58 € 18,50 €

A globalizáció paradoxona


Dani Rodrik, a Harvard Egyetem közgazdászprofesszora világszerte nagy feltűnést keltő új kötetében a válságot követő időszak útkeresésének egyik legaktuálisabb kérdésével, a demokrácia és a globalizáció viszonyával és az ebből adódó dilemmákkal foglalkozik. Könyvének központi kérdése: vajon fennáll-e a veszélye annak, hogy a globalizáció jelenlegi, hiperglobalizációnak nevezett szakasza aláássa a nemzeti keretek között működő demokráciát. A szerző újszerűen tárgyalja az állam és a piac viszonyát, ami a közgazdaságtan egyik leginkább vitatott kérdése. Végigvezeti az olvasót a kapitalizmus háromszáz éves történetén, hogy levonja a következtetést: a piac és az állam kiegészítik, nem pedig helyettesítik egymást. Ha több és jobb piacot akarunk, több és jobb kormányzásra van szükség. A piacok nem ott működnek a legjobban, ahol az állam a leggyengébb, hanem ott, ahol erős.
Vypredané
14,58 € 15,35 €

Economics Rules


In the wake of the financial crisis and the Great Recession, economics seems anything but a science. In this sharp, masterfully argued book, Dani Rodrik, a leading critic from within, takes a close look at economics to examine when it falls short and when it works, to give a surprisingly upbeat account of the discipline. Drawing on the history of the field and his deep experience as a practitioner, Rodrik argues that economics can be a powerful tool that improves the world but only when economists abandon universal theories and focus on getting the context right. Economics Rules argues that the discipline's much-derided mathematical models are its true strength. Models are the tools that make economics a science. Too often, however, economists mistake a model for the model that applies everywhere and at all times. In six chapters that trace his discipline from Adam Smith to present-day work on globalization, Rodrik shows how diverse situations call for different models. Each model tells a partial story about how the world works. These stories offer wide-ranging, and sometimes contradictory, lessons just as children s fables offer diverse morals. Whether the question concerns the rise of global inequality, the consequences of free trade, or the value of deficit spending, Rodrik explains how using the right models can deliver valuable new insights about social reality and public policy. Beyond the science, economics requires the craft to apply suitable models to the context. The 2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers challenged many economists' deepest assumptions about free markets. Rodrik reveals that economists' model toolkit is much richer than these free-market models. With pragmatic model selection, economists can develop successful antipoverty programs in Mexico, growth strategies in Africa, and intelligent remedies for domestic inequality. At once a forceful critique and defense of the discipline, Economics Rules charts a path toward a more humble but more effective science.
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12,30 € 12,95 €

Economics Rules


The economics profession has become a favourite punching bag in the aftermath of the global financial crisis. Economists are widely reviled and their influence derided by the general public. Yet their services have never been in greater demand. To unravel the paradox, we need to understand both the strengths and weaknesses of economics. Dani Rodrik argues that the multiplicity of theoretical frameworks - what economists call 'models' that exist side by side is economics' great strength. Economists are trained to hold diverse, possibly contradictory models of the world in their minds. This is what allows them, when they do their job right, to comprehend the world, make useful suggestions for improving it, and to advance their stock of knowledge over time. In short, it is what makes economics a 'science' a different kind of science from physics or some other natural sciences, but a science nonetheless. But syncretism is not a comfortable state of mind, and economists often jettison it for misplaced confidence and arrogance, especially when they confront questions of public policy. Economists are prone to fads and fashions, and behave too often as if their discipline is about the search for the model that works always and everywhere, rather than a portfolio of models. Their training lets them down when it comes to navigating among diverse models and figuring out which one applies where. Ideology and political preferences frequently substitute for analysis in choosing among models. So the book offers both a defence and critique of economics. Economists' way of thinking about social phenomena has great advantages. But the flexible, contextual nature of economics is also its Achilles' heel in the hands of clumsy practitioners.
Vypredané
15,15 € 15,95 €